Faces of Nepal by Jeremy Snell

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The beauty of the Nepali people shown through an array of video portraits. These type of portraits involve a certain amount of trust between those being filmed and the filmmaker. Such portraits bring an intimate and human perspective towards complete strangers. Directed, Edited, and Filmed by Jeremy Snell
Filmed with a Canon 5Dmkiii using Magic Lantern RAW, and a Red Scarlet

Still Wanting to Learn by Brendan ó

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“I am from Cork, Ireland. An amateur photographer who is still learning, and still wanting to learn. Trying to see what can be seen and how to see it.” ~ Brendan ó

Getting more Challenging by David Mor

7780430736_5c1d2a963a_z“My initial exposure to photography began years ago, in the era of film and wet dark room when I was studying architecture and visual art. One of my teachers, a sort of Wittgenstein-type, had a keen interest in photography. In his spare time he taught us the secrets of the dark room as well, and perhaps more importantly, how to implement what we had studied in visual art to real life scenes. These were the days the seeds of my interest in photography were sown. Only years later in the digital period my motivation has changed in a way. I wanted to work all the harder because it is getting more challenging. I got rid of all my modern lenses with autofocus and vibration reduction/optical stabilization and opted for manual primes instead. It took time and effort to focus not only on framing the scene but being more attached, or perhaps in connection, with the scene seen through the lens. And thus in the short period since my confidence has grown I have won several International and local contests, among them the Carl Zeiss 2011 (Every moment tells a story), and the IREX 2012 (Make a better world) photo contests. Whether this is the emergence of a new path or not, only time will tell…”  David Mor

People and their Emotions by Rakesh JV

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“My name is Rakesh JV. I work as an instructional designer in Accenture. I started photography around 1 and a half years ago when I got my first DSLR. It was love at first sight. Though I started off initially with taking pictures of friends, over a period of time I got bored and wanted to do something new. This is where street photography came in. I am intrigued by people and their emotions. For a ‘used-to-be introvert’ like me, this was an eye opener. I realized that people all over, in spite of societal differences, required the same basic things. This was just a start to my photographic journey.

Incredible India by Andrew Kirkby

Kirkby_india_0981Incredible India tells the story of a young couple and their journey by railway across Northern India. The adventure spans from the majestic foothills of the Himalayas in West Bengal to the Land of the Kings in Rajasthan. A local priest narrates the story commenting on the culture, spirituality and people that make India such a unique and incredible destination to travel. A hot-air balloon flight over the forts of Jaipur, weaving through traffic on motorcycles in Kolkata, a traditional Hindu wedding in Agra, prayers on the banks of the holy Ganges in Varanasi, and fireworks lighting up the skies of Darjeeling during Diwali – these are just a few of many travel experiences in Incredible India. Andrew Kirkby

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High Himalaya by Eric Valli

For 20 years I trekked this unforgiving region always with a Leica in my hand. I remain captivated by the stunning landscapes and the kindness of the people. Eric Valli

Africa by Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao

Looking at the map while sipping coffee from the comfort of home, the drive from the capital of Swaziland, through southern Mozambique and back through South Africa looked pretty straightforward. Google maps even gave driving times and street directions the same as if we were trying to get to a Starbucks in Hollywood.

Gone it seemed were the days of Hemingway’s Africa, swallowed up by this endless planet-shrinking media. (Never mind the deeply complex reality of Africa, we’re talking adventure fantasy here.)

Ten days, three flat tires, one attempted mugging, one corrupt border official, countless wild animal sightings and several bottles of Mozambique’s finest beer and South Africa’s worst wine later… we can humbly attest to the incredibly obvious fact that even in the age of Facebook, Google maps, GPS and all the rest of it, the world is still a big, beautiful and fairly scary place.

Jessica Haye and Clark Hsiao’s website